Adolescents

25% of the sexually experienced population is comprised of people aged 15-24 years; however, this quarter of the population acquires nearly half of all new STIs/STDs. See here for an analysis of the determinants of STD/HIV risk. The higher risk of catching an STD/STI from adolescents aged 15-19 of years and from young adults aged 20-24 years is thought to be due to the aggregation and combination of behavioral, biological and cultural reasons. What are the legal and ethical issues surrounding adolescents? Higher rates of STDS for these vulnerable ages may occur from multiple barriers such as access to STD prevention services, lack of health insurance, lack of financing, no transportation and confidentiality concerns. Social and cultural factors that apply to these at-risk adolescents need to be fostered and deployed to improve the overall and contributing social conditions at work. In Teen-talk and in Teen-talk True or False frequently asked questions regarding at risk adolescents are answered. In addition myths surrounding STDS/STIs are dispelled.

 

Observations from CDC Detection Center, San Antonio Texas 

 

Chlamydia

Rates of reported chlamydial infection among persons aged 15–19 years and 20–24 years continue to increase. During 2009–2010, rates increased 2.8% for those aged 15–19 years and 7.5% for those aged 20–24 years.

15- to 19-Year-Old Women—In 2010, the rate among women aged 15–19 years was 3,378.2 cases per 100,000 females, a 1.9% increase from the 2009 rate of 3,314.7 cases per 100,000.

20- to 24-Year-Old Women—In 2010, women aged 20–24 years had the highest rate of chlamydia (3,407.9 cases per 100,000 females) compared with any other age or sex group. Chlamydia rates for women in this age group increased 6.9% during 2009–2010.

15- to 19-Year-Old Men—Chlamydia rates for men aged 15–19 years increased 6.0% from 730.5 cases per 100,000 males in 2009 to 774.3 cases per 100,000 in 2010.

20- to 24-Year-Old Men—In 2010, as in previous years, men aged 20–24 years had the highest rate of chlamydia (1,187.0 cases per 100,000 males). Chlamydia rates for men in this age group increased 8.8% during 2009–2010.

 

Gonorrhea

During 2009–2010, gonorrhea rates increased for persons aged 15–19 years (1.4%) and 20–24 years (4.9%).

15- to 19-Year-Old Women—In 2010, as in previous years, women aged 15–19 years had the highest rate of gonorrhea (570.9 cases per 100,000 females) compared with any other age or sex group. During 2009–2010, gonorrhea rates for women of this age group increased 0.9%.

20- to 24-Year-Old Women—In 2010, as in previous years, women aged 20–24 years had the second highest rate of gonorrhea (560.7 cases per 100,000 females) compared with any other age or sex group. During 2009–2010, gonorrhea rates for women in this age group increased 3.8%.

15- to 19-Year-Old Men—In 2010, as in previous years, men aged 15–19 years had the second highest rate of gonorrhea (253.4 cases per 100,000 males). During 2009–2010, gonorrhea rates for men in this age group increased 2.1%.

20- to 24-Year-Old Men—In 2010, as in previous years, men aged 20–24 years had the highest rate of gonorrhea (421.0 cases per 100,000 males). During 2009–2010, gonorrhea rates for men in this age group increased 6.2%.

 

Primary and Secondary Syphilis

Syphilis rates among women aged 15–19 years increased annually from 2004–2009 from 1.5 cases per 100,000 females to 3.3 cases in 2009, but decreased to 3.0 in 2010. Rates in women have been highest each year among those aged 20–24 years with 4.5 cases per 100,000 females in 2010.

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